Thursday, December 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

Fifty years ago this month, Rochester's two funeral homes, Potere and Pixley, made a joint announcement.  The two firms notified the city of Rochester that they were going out of the ambulance business in order to devote all of their time and attention solely to funeral services.

For years, ambulance calls in Rochester had been answered alternately by the funeral homes. The police dispatcher used a card with "Pixley" printed on one side and "Potere" on the other, as the two companies took turns responding to calls.  Their ambulances were transportation only, and did not carry life support equipment or personnel with medical training.

Following the announcement by the funeral homes in December 1966, Rochester contracted with Fleet Ambulance and St. Onge Ambulance to provide services to Rochester residents.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

In November 1966, the citizens of Rochester celebrated an improvement to the Avon Township Park (known today as Rochester Municipal Park).  The Kiwanis Club of Rochester dedicated a brand new pavilion on the bank of Paint Creek at the east end of the park, overlooking the river and the municipal pond.  The shelter had been built at a cost of $6000, with Kiwanis Club members doing all of the work themselves, except for the pouring of the concrete floor.  Fifty years later, we are still enjoying their contribution to the park.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

It's been half a century since touch-tone telephone service was inaugurated in the Rochester area.  In September 1966, Michigan Bell officials announced that a new facility on Tienken Road would take over the telephone circuits for Rochester and the old building at the corner of Third & Walnut streets would be vacated.  All 5,800 telephone customers in greater Rochester would be assigned the '651' prefix, and touch-tone calling would be available for the first time in the area.

The company announced that it would no longer offer 4-party lines, but 2-party service would still be available on a limited basis.

Monday, August 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

Apparently, the old adage was right - there really is nothing new under the sun.  A look back at the Rochester Clarion headlines of 50 years ago this month reveals the same news that is unfolding in our community today.  In August 1966, Rochester area residents were impatiently watching the reconstruction of the intersection of Avon and Rochester roads.  Part of the project included the installation of a long-awaited traffic signal.  Leader Dogs for the Blind, along with Detroit Broach and Machine (located where Sanyo is today), had told the State of Michigan for years that the intersection was too busy and accident-ridden to be governed only by stop signs.  Fifty years ago, state officials got the message.  Can you imagine that intersection without a traffic signal today?

Friday, July 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

Half a century ago this month, the Rochester Board of Education voted to take its first big step forward with computer technology.   In July 1966, the board agreed to participate in the new Oakland Schools data processing center, which was under development at the time and was slated to begin service in January 1968.

The proposed network was described as being the first of its kind in the country.  Participating districts would be linked via leased telephone lines to the mainframe computer located in Pontiac. The system was designed to handle budget and finance, pupil and personnel records, and testing and grade reporting.  The cost to Rochester Community Schools for these computer services was estimated to be $13,000 - $32,000 annually.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

In June 1966, leaders of the Rochester community gathered to celebrate the cornerstone laying for the suburban unit of Crittenton Hospital on University Drive.  The first full-service hospital to serve the area was welcomed and eagerly anticipated by citizens who were accustomed to traveling to Pontiac, Mount Clemens or Detroit for their acute health care needs.  Thus, when Crittenton Hospital of Detroit announced plans to build a suburban unit, village and township officials lobbied to have the facility located here.  Howard L. McGregor, Jr., vice-president of the hospital board of trustees and chairman of the fundraising committee for the Rochester location, presided over the cornerstone ceremony and U.S. Senator Robert Griffin delivered the keynote address on that memorable day.


Sunday, May 1, 2016

This Month in Rochester History

Fifty years ago this month, Rochester took a big step forward in the redevelopment of the old Chapman mill pond lake bed.  The property lying east of the railroad track in downtown Rochester had been under water until June 1946, when a spring storm caused the bermage around the Western Knitting Mills dam to fail, thereby draining the pond.  The dam was never rebuilt, the old lake bed was filled, and the property lay vacant for two decades before plans for the parcel began to take shape in the mid-1960s.

In 1966, the former mill pond area was undergoing development and the Rochester Elks Club planned a $300,000 lodge building on the property.  The single-story building would include a dining room, banquet room, cocktail lounge, and two meeting rooms, plus an office and lobby.  A patio overlooking Paint Creek was also planned.  In May 1966, the official groundbreaking for the new Elks Club building was held.  The building stood until about 2003, when it was demolished to make room for the construction of the Royal Park Hotel, which now stands on the site.